NANO 104: Nanotechnology for Traditional & Emerging Energy Technology

Speaker Dr. Wade Adams, Smalley Institute; Dr. Michael Wong, Rice University; Dr. Valerie Moore of Advanced
Dr. Wade Adams, Director of the Smalley Institute, joined the Institute after retiring from the US Air Force senior executive ranks in January 2002, as the Chief Scientist of the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. For the past 39 years he has ...

Dr. Wade Adams, Director of the Smalley Institute, joined the Institute after retiring from the US Air Force senior executive ranks in January 2002, as the Chief Scientist of the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. For the past 39 years he has conducted research in polymer physics, concentrating on structure-property relations in high-performance organic materials. He is internationally known for his research in high-performance rigid-rod polymer fibers, X-ray scattering studies of fibers and liquid crystalline films, polymer dispersed liquid crystals, and theoretical studies of ultimate polymer properties. He has written more than 200 publications on these topics, including several review articles and three books, and has given more than 700 presentations. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Air Force Research Laboratory. Dr. Adams also retired from the Air Force Reserve in the rank of Colonel in 1998.


 


Dr. Michael S. Wong leads the Catalysis and Nanomaterials Laboratory in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Rice University. The laboratory is engaged in fundamental and applied research at the interface of Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, and Materials Science, with the central theme of functional nanoparticle-based materials. Treating nanoparticles (NPs) as building blocks and assembling them into useful structures is a powerful concept in "bottom-up" nanotechnology, in which the dimension-dependent properties of the NPs can be handled and exploited in a usable form (such as porous oxides and microcapsules). Such materials may address long-standing problems in the environment, energy, and health. Dr. Wong has received the GOLD 2006 Conference Best Presentation Award, for "best new idea in gold catalysis" (2006); AIChE Nanoscale Science and Engineering Forum Young Investigator Award; MIT Technology Review's TR35 Young Innovator Award; and Hershel M. Rich Invention Award.

 


The Advanced Energy Consortium facilitates pre-competitive research in micro- and nanotechnology materials and sensors that have the potential to create a positive and disruptive change in the recovery of petroleum and gas from new and existing reservoirs.


   The consortium’s primary goal is to develop intelligent subsurface micro- and nanosensors that can be injected into oil and gas reservoirs to help characterize the space in three dimensions and improve the recovery of existing and new hydrocarbon resources. By leveraging existing surface infrastructure, the technology will minimize environmental impact. The consortium also believes that there is near term potential to increase the recovery rate in existing reservoirs by exploiting the unique chemical and physical properties of materials at the nano scale.


 


NanoComposites Inc. (NCI) is a Houston-based technology company developing material solutions that will protect the company’s clients and partners from the financial and human cost of materials failure.  In doing so, NCI derives revenue from sale of materials as well as royalty payments that enable additional value capture.  NCI’s IP portfolio is comprised of exclusive and unrestricted rights to 21 US and international patents from Rice University, as well as trade secrets developed in NCI’s Houston laboratory.


   Dr. Jeffrey Bahr, responsible for operations of NCI, drives the technology strategy and development efforts of the company. Bahr, a recognized expert in nanomaterials and polymer technologies, is an inventor on six issued US patents, has coauthored numerous technical publications and has been an invited speaker at technical conferences and corporations throughout the US & Europe. He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Arizona State University and was a NASA-supported Postdoctoral Fellow in carbon nanotechnology at Rice University under the direction of Professor James M. Tour and Nobel Laureate Richard Smalley.


 

Full Description
Organizer LaVonne Carlson

When

Fri, Apr. 30, 2010
7:30 a.m. - noon US/Central

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Where

Houston Technology Center
410 Pierce Street
Houston, TX 77002
USA